Eco-Sexual Improv:
Somatic Seduction With The Natural Environment

The etymology of arousal – from French: reuser – means to stir or awaken. Its deeper origins describe the gesture of a hawk’s vigorous shaking of its feathers. Along these lines, we will use our own bodies in erotic play to explore the sources of primal sexual impulse – the land itself, and the creatures that inhabit it. We’ll endeavour to shift out of a human-centric sexuality, opening ourselves to listening and responding to the sometimes wild, sometimes soothing currents of ecstatic arousal that are possible when we trouble the boundaries between ourselves and our non-human relations. One might invite courtship with the languid drift of clouds, the rhythmic brittle textures of cricket song, or the soaring of hawks riding thermals under their unbridled wingspans.

Various somatically-induced states of consciousness will be flirted and teased with, where participants will be encouraged in deep solo work to use breath, movement, and sounding, in order to expand their sense-based awareness around arousal to include the natural world, and to follow wherever those impulses lead them in a sensual/sexual improvised duet where the sky’s the limit (literally!). We’ll likewise ponder the application of CI principles of consent, respect, communication, and personal accountability within these non-human relationships.

My Pelvis, Your Pelvis:
Exploring and Learning from Movement, Images, and Touch

The pelvis and its intimate geographies are not only central to our biomechanical movement capacities, they are also landscapes for the internalization and performance of cultural identity; gender, race, sexual orientation, class, and more. The pelvic region also hosts the reproductive functions through which our species conceives and procreates. It is likewise the site of our genitalia and a great amount of our sexual focus, both sensually and culturally. Energetically, the root chakra at the base of the pelvis is where we live our most fundamental relationships with life and death, our existential sense of home, and our connection with the earth and her primal energies.

It’s remarkable, considering all this, the poverty of knowledge and experience so many of us come to this region with; both in ourselves and in others.

The workshop facilitators will guide participants through a series of solo and paired movement and explorations of this sacred landscape, developing capacities for feeling, observing, describing, and communicating the complexity of experiences related to the pelvis. We will – together – map both the somatic and cultural landscapes of our pelvis in a generous and safe environment.

* Note: This second class will be co-taught with Alyssa Lynes & Rob Kancler, expanding on a lab we recently facilitated together at the Fuerteventura CI festival. The feedback from participants was very positive, and the three of us are excited for potentially developing this work further in the Touch & Play context.

 

Christos Galanis has been exploring improv and movement for over twenty years, including an ongoing love-affair with the Earthdance community and the lands that host it. Most recently, he was one of the producers of SEEDS 2016 at Earthdance in which artists, activists, scientists, and local community members spent ten days interrogating the intersections of dance, nature, art, race, gender, and community. The last few years he has been teaching somatic/movement workshops linked with the Axis Syllabus community in Berlin, Athens, Patras, and Genoa, including Nomadic Colleges @ Earthdance and in Puglia, Italy. He has likewise been deeply involved as both a project-leader and organizer at E|MERGE over the years, and has participated in over a dozen international artist residencies.

Currently based in Scotland as a PhD candidate in Cultural Geography at the University of Edinburgh, his academic research praxis centres on Indigenous (Native American and European) qualities of embodied relationship with Land/Spirit through movement, ritual, and artistic practice. He is passionate and excited for exploring the potential for somatic/improv practices as tools for decolonizing relationships with Land/Spirit/Body.